While the rest of us have been passing our time at home binge-watching Love is Blind or Tiger King on Netflix, writer Sage Boggs has been incredibly busy uncovering the answer to an age-old mystery: how the Triscuit cracker got its name. And those efforts have yielded exactly the enlightening content the world needed right now.

In fairness to Boggs, a former staffer on The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon, his interest in this timeless topic long pre-dated the age of social distancing.

“Several years ago I was at a party (BRAG!), and I spotted a box of Triscuits. I asked everyone, ‘What does the word Triscuit mean? It’s clearly based on the word biscuit, but what does the tri mean?'” Boggs wrote to his more than 50,000 Twitter followers.

The consensus was that tri meant three, perhaps a nod to either “three layers” or “three ingredients.” Since no one knew for sure, Boggs did what any normal internet sleuth would do: He Googled the answer. Interestingly, Google only turned up more questions than answers.

“So we went straight to the source,” Boggs revealed. “We emailed Nabisco. And the response we got a few days later shook us to the core.”

“Thank you for your interest in our Triscuit crackers,” Nabisco responded. “No business records survived which specifically explain the origins or inspiration for the name Triscuit. But we do know the name was chosen as a fun derivation of the word biscuit. The tri does not mean 3.”

How exactly did they know tri did not mean three? Also, what happened to that poor Triscuit factory? To get an answer, Boggs took matters into his own hands, uncovering some early Triscuit advertisements online in the process.

“In the early 1900’s, Triscuit was run out of Niagara Falls. And their big selling point? Being ‘baked by electricity.’ They were ‘the only food on the market prepared by this 1903 process.’ Look at the lightning bolts!” he wrote. “And that’s when it clicked—Elec-TRI-city Biscuit.”

The official Twitter account for Triscuit later confirmed that its name indeed means electricity biscuit. There you have it, folks.

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